Family: Convolvulaceae

morning glory family

Our species in the Convolvulaceae are annual or perennial vines. The leaves are simple and alternate in most species. The flowers may be large or small and are actinomorphic (radially symmetrical), with sepals and petals attaching below the ovary (i.e., the ovary is superior). The flowers are generally 5-merous, with fused petals that form a funnel or tube that, as a bud, is twisted longitudinally so that the parts overlap one another. The flowers have both pollen-bearing and ovule-bearing parts, with 5 stamens and 1 style that may be forked. The fruit of most species is a capsule. Some species do not produce chlorophyll, but instead derive nutrients by parasitizing other plants. In these species, the leaves resemble scales and grow along pink-yellow to orange stems, and the flowers have 2 styles and 4-5 sepals and petals. These parasitic species (dodders) were formerly placed in the Cuscutaceae.

This Family’s Genera in New England:

Visit this family in the Dichotomous Key