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Ace Acer

Our ace botanists are here to help you identify wild New England plants and to answer questions about their ecology and conservation. When posting a question, please provide the location, habitat (e.g. river, mountain, woodland), and photographs of the plant.

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Recently Answered Questions

  • Question
    This was stuck to a red oak leaf on the forest floor in north-central Connecticut on 2018-2-16. It had the consistency of jelly and was semi-transparent. It looked a lot like a clump of melting snow. Eggs of some sort are in the jelly is my guess.
    Answer
    Dear David, I'm not sure what you have found. It could be a jelly fungus of some kind, but I've not seen this before. I wish I could be of more help, but I think this question should be directed to a mycological group. Good luck! (Monday, 19 February 2018)
  • Question
    This flower, taken on 6/20/13, on the Joppa Flats grounds, Newburyport, doesn't seem to quite match up with your Ipomoea (Morning-glory) suspects, though it seems to look most like I. purpurea. I note the dark stems, and the more triangular leaves. Are there other flowers that look like Morning-glories?
    Answer
    Dear chaffeemonell, you've photographed Calystegia sepium (hedge false bindweed), a member of the Convolvulaceae. Note the two large green bracts that conceal the sepals (this is an important characteristic that identifies the genus). There are four different subspecies in New England, three of them native (and likely the one you've photographed is a native). Best wishes. (Monday, 19 February 2018)
  • Question
    hi! can i ask what kind of bamboo species is this?
    Answer
    jezzy, I'm sorry that I cannot help you. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of New England (northeastern United States). We only have a couple of introduced species of bamboo so I do not possess much familiarity with this genus. If I knew where you were located in the world, I might be able to help you find a resource near you to help with identification. Best wishes. (Monday, 5 February 2018)
  • Question
    Hello, this grass was identified on a frozen beaver pond. Habitat was a freshwater emergent wetland with many red maples snags (due to beaver activity). I don't have too many measurements but the height was 2ft and the inflorescence was approximately 4 inches in length. Other species in the vicinity was Decodon verticillatus. The plant grew a loose colony. Thanks for your help!
    Answer
    Dear eehrlich, this grass looks like Glyceria obtusa (Atlantic manna grass), a native wetland grass. The dense collection of spikelets is one of its defining characteristics within this genus. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    Hello! this plant may require more information and another picture during the growing season. This was approximately 1.5 ft in height in a freshwater emergent wetland on a frozen pond. The grass appeared to grow in loose clumps. Inflorescence was present on branches on the main axis. The plant was located in Stonington Connecticut.
    Answer
    Deer eehrlich, unfortunately, the plant remnants in the photograph are a little too tattered for me to identify. I'm sorry I cannot help you. A growing season image will be needed (and I look forward to it if you are able to secure one). Best wishes. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    I live in upstate NY/VT border & In the fall I saw a plant ready to bloom in my garden and took it inside, can u tell me what this ?
    Answer
    Dear Jgm1a1, good morning. I'm sorry that I can't help you with your question. Go Botany is a website dedicated to wild plants of the northeast. While we will entertain any plant-related questions, some cultivated species are not known to us. Again, I wish I could be of more help with your question. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    Hi! I wonder if you could help with the ID of this mint. I find them vexing, as there are so many genera. Based mainly on flowers and leaves, I'm leaning toward Scutellaria, sp. Hoping to get it to species. Additionally, do you have any general tips for navigating this family, other than trying to follow the Dichotomous Key?
    Answer
    Dear chafeemonell, it looks like you have a species of Nepeta (catnip) in the Lamiaceae. The leaf shape and venation suggest this, along with the morphology of the corolla. If this were a Scutellaria, there would be a transverse ridge across the top of the calyx (sepals). I can't tell you which species for certain without additional images, such as straight on to the flower. Navigating family level taxonomy is difficult, but with practice you learn the features of these families. Of course, the multiple-access key on Go Botany can sometimes reduce things down to a family or two for you. Keep at it (and I'm happy to help whenever I can) and you will learn the plant families of the region. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    Picture of this garden from July of 2016 in Onion Lake, Saskatchewan. The question I am about to ask does not involve this picture either but as I take a botany online course there is only pretty much question left on my paperwork that I am stuck on but everything is all good and done. Just 1 question which is on my paper but I always good times with my plants and garden. Why some plants have to be harder than others?
    Answer
    Dear Kool_planter9, good morning. I'm not sure I understand your question yet. When you ask about "harder than others", are you describing the difficulty of propagating them or some other feature of their life history? If you want to send an email to ahaines[at]newenglandwild.org, I am happy to discuss your question further. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    I revived this plant from a 1" stalk and now 6mos in this is what it looks like... I was just wondering if you knew what it was... Thx in advance.
    Answer
    Dear bdk28602014, the plant you have pictured is a species of Kalanchoe, commonly cultivated species from Africa and Madagascar. These belong to the stonecrop family (Crassulaceae). Enjoy the flowers. (Monday, 29 January 2018)
  • Question
    I trust you or others in your group can help ID the plant in the attached picture. I hope this is of interest. It was found on Mount Ann trail in Gloucester MA.Thanks- BP
    Answer
    Dear brucepiper40, thanks for your question. Unfortunately, I won't be able to help because the "plant" in the image is a species of fungus. You will need to direct this question to a mycology group. I'm sorry I can't be of more help. (Monday, 29 January 2018)

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