Eclipta prostrata (L.) L.

false daisy

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New England Distribution

Adapted from BONAP data

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North America Distribution

Adapted from BONAP data

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Facts About

False daisy is native to parts of North America, but its range does not encompass New England, where it has been collected in Massachusetts, and recently in Connecticut. False daisy is used in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine against liver disease and to restore hair growth.

Habitat

Anthropogenic (man-made or disturbed habitats)

Characteristics

Habitat
terrestrial
New England state
  • Connecticut
  • Massachusetts
Leaf type
leaves are simple (i.e., lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets)
Leaf arrangement
opposite: there are two leaves per node along the stem
Leaf blade edges
the edge of the leaf blade has teeth
Flower type in flower heads
the flower head has tubular disk flowers in the center and ray flowers, these often strap-shaped, around the periphery
Ray flower color
white
Tuft or plume on fruit
there is no plume, or the plume is made up of scales, awns, a crown, or a rim
Spines on plant
the plant has no spines
Leaf blade length
20–100 mm
Flower head width
5–10 mm
Disk flower number
  • 11-20
  • 21-50
Show All Characteristics
  • Flowers
    Bract cycle number
    • there are two main cycles of bracts
    • there is one main cycle of bracts
    Bract outer side hair type
    the bracts are hairy, with simple hairs on their outer surface
    Bract outer side hairs
    the bracts are hairy on their outer surfaces
    Disk flower color
    white
    Disk flower number
    • 11-20
    • 21-50
    Flower head platform
    the base has papery scales on it
    Flower head width
    5–10 mm
    Flower type in flower heads
    the flower head has tubular disk flowers in the center and ray flowers, these often strap-shaped, around the periphery
    Height of flower head base
    3–5 mm
    Ovary cross-section
    the ovary is compressed (flattened)
    Ray flower color
    white
    Ray flowers
    • 16-25
    • 26-50
  • Fruits or seeds
    Ovary length in developed fruit
    2.5 mm
    Tuft or plume on fruit
    there is no plume, or the plume is made up of scales, awns, a crown, or a rim
  • Growth form
    Growth form
    the plant has one or more free-standing stems
    Spines on plant
    the plant has no spines
  • Leaves
    Hairs on underside of leaf blade
    the underside of the leaf is fuzzy or hairy
    Leaf arrangement
    opposite: there are two leaves per node along the stem
    Leaf blade base
    • the leaf has a distinct petiole
    • the leaf has no petiole
    Leaf blade base shape
    the base of the leaf blade is cuneate (wedge-shaped, tapers to the base with relatively straight, converging edges), or narrow
    Leaf blade edges
    the edge of the leaf blade has teeth
    Leaf blade hairs
    the leaf blade has simple hairs with no glands, and not tangled or wooly
    Leaf blade length
    20–100 mm
    Leaf blade shape
    • the leaf blade is lanceolate (lance-shaped; widest below the middle and tapering at both ends)
    • the leaf blade is ovate (widest below the middle and broadly tapering at both ends)
    Leaf blade veins
    the leaf blade has one main vein running from the base towards the tip
    Leaf spines
    there are no spines on the leaf edges
    Leaf stalk
    • the leaves have leaf stalks
    • the leaves have no leaf stalks, but attach directly to the stem
    Leaf type
    leaves are simple (i.e., lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets)
    Specific leaf type
    the leaves are simple (i.e., lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets
  • Place
    Habitat
    terrestrial
    New England state
    • Connecticut
    • Massachusetts
    Specific habitat
    man-made or disturbed habitats
  • Stem, shoot, branch
    Stem internode hair type
    the hairs on the stem are plain, without glands or branches, and not tangled
    Stem internode hairs
    the stem has hairs between the nodes

Wetland Status

Usually occurs in wetlands, but occasionally in non-wetlands. (Wetland indicator code: FACW)

New England Distribution and Conservation Status

Distribution

Connecticut
absent
Maine
absent
Massachusetts
present
New Hampshire
absent
Rhode Island
absent
Vermont
absent

Conservation Status

Exact status definitions can vary from state to state. For details, please check with your state.

Massachusetts
unranked (S-rank: SNR)

Native to North America?

Yes and no (some introduced)

Sometimes Confused With

Galinsoga quadriradiata:
capitula with 3-8 ray flowers and leaf blades lanceolate to broad-ovate, 15-45 mm wide (vs. E. prostrate, with capitula with 20-40 ray flowers and leaf blades narrow-lanceolate to lanceolate, 4-30 mm wide).
Galinsoga parviflora:
capitula with 3-8 ray flowers and leaf blades lanceolate to broad-ovate, 15-70 mm wide (vs. E. prostrate, with capitula with 20-40 ray flowers and leaf blades narrow-lanceolate to lanceolate, 4-30 mm wide).

Synonyms

  • Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk.
  • Verbesina prostrata L.

Family

Asteraceae

Genus

Eclipta

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Information from Dichotomous Key of Flora Novae Angliae

1.  Eclipta prostrata (L.) L. E

false daisy. Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk.; Verbesina prostrata L. • CT, MA. Waste areas, disturbed places, trail edges. This species recently collected in the Connecticut River drainage of CT along the edge of a trail through a fresh-tidal wetland.