Salvinia minima Baker

common watermoss

Copyright: various copyright holders. To reuse an image, please click it to see who you will need to contact.

New England Distribution

Adapted from BONAP data

Found this plant? Take a photo and post a sighting.

North America Distribution

Adapted from BONAP data

enlarge

Facts About

Despite its name, you are not likely to encounter common watermoss (actually an aquatic fern) in New England, as it has only been collected in the wild once, in 1941 in Massachusetts. It is native to Central and South America, and invasive to some southern states, where it forms dense mats at the water surface, shading out aquatic plants.

Habitat

Lacustrine (in lakes or ponds), riverine (in rivers or streams)

Characteristics

Habitat
aquatic
New England state
Massachusetts
Show All Characteristics
  • Leaves
    Features of leaves
    the leaves are hairy, with hairs that branch into four branches near the tip
  • Place
    Habitat
    aquatic
    New England state
    Massachusetts
    Specific habitat
    • in lakes or ponds
    • in rivers or streams

Wetland Status

Occurs only in wetlands. (Wetland indicator code: OBL)

New England Distribution and Conservation Status

Distribution

Connecticut
absent
Maine
absent
Massachusetts
present
New Hampshire
absent
Rhode Island
absent
Vermont
absent

Conservation Status

Exact status definitions can vary from state to state. For details, please check with your state.

Massachusetts
unranked (S-rank: SNR)

Native to North America?

No

Family

Salviniaceae

Genus

Salvinia

Need Help?

Get Help

Information from Dichotomous Key of Flora Novae Angliae

1.  Salvinia minima Baker E

common watermoss. MA. Still or slow-moving water of ponds, streams, and canals. The report of Salvinia natans (L.) Allioni in Norfolk County, MA, by Angelo and Boufford (1996) was based on collections originally determined as Salvinia rotundifolia Willd. (a misapplied name)—
13 Aug 1941, Coffin s.n. ( GH!, NEBC!). The specimens are S. minima, as evidenced by the leaf blades abaxially with hairs 2–3 mm long that have apically distinct branches. A collection from Middlesex County, MA, determined as S. natans, was taken from the Harvard University Greenhouses (i.e., it was taken from cultivated plants)—Jun 1966, Tryon s.n. ( GH!).